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    • March 1997
    • 9780231105156
  • 304 Pages
  • Paperback
  • $32.00

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    • December 2009
    • 9780231150750
  • 352 Pages
  • Paperback
  • $27.95

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    • March 1997
    • 9780231105149
  • 304 Pages
  • Hardcover
  • $90.00

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    • December 2009
    • 9780231150743
  • 352 Pages
  • Hardcover
  • $80.00

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    • December 2009
    • 9780231521741
  • 352 Pages
  • E-book
  • $26.99
    • November -1
    • 9780231527163
  • 304 Pages
  • E-book
  • $31.99

Palestinian Identity

The Construction of Modern National Consciousness

Rashid Khalidi; With a New Introduction by the Author

This foundational text now features a new introduction by Rashid Khalidi reflecting on the significance of his work over the past decade and its relationship to the struggle for Palestinian nationhood. Khalidi also casts an eye to the future, noting the strength of Palestinian identity and social solidarity yet wondering whether current trends will lead to Palestinian statehood and independence.

About the Author

Rashid Khalidi is Edward Said Professor of Arab Studies at Columbia University. He is also the author of Under Siege: P. L.O. Decisionmaking During the 1982 War, The Iron Cage: The Story of the Palestinian Struggle for Statehood, and Sowing Crisis: The Cold War and American Dominance in the Middle East, and coeditor of The Origins of Arab Nationalism.

One of the pre-eminent historians of Palestinian nationalism.

A major contribution to historical Palestinian nationalism.

An impressive, thoughtful, layered, and well-documented study.

Pathbreaking.

"I believe that discussions of whether a one-state or a two-state solution to this conflict is preferable have a slightly surreal quality in the current critical environment. What has to be done is not to debate how many states can dance on the head of a pin, but rather to devise how to reverse—very rapidly—the powerful current dynamic and get the Palestinian people out of the state they are in. The highly inequitable de facto one-state 'solution' now in effect looks more and more entrenched, but, paradoxically, I predict it will become more and more untenable and more violently unstable as time goes on."-From the new introduction