American Literature in the World

An Anthology from Anne Bradstreet to Octavia Butler

Edited by Wai Chee Dimock, with Jordan Brower, Edgar Garcia, Kyle Hutzler, and Nicholas Rinehart

Columbia University Press

American Literature in the World

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Pub Date: January 2017

ISBN: 9780231157377

504 Pages

Format: Paperback

List Price: $40.00

Pub Date: January 2017

ISBN: 9780231157360

504 Pages

Format: Hardcover

List Price: $120.00

American Literature in the World

An Anthology from Anne Bradstreet to Octavia Butler

Edited by Wai Chee Dimock, with Jordan Brower, Edgar Garcia, Kyle Hutzler, and Nicholas Rinehart

Columbia University Press

American Literature in the World is an innovative anthology offering a new way to understand the global forces that have shaped the making of American literature. The wide-ranging selections are structured around five interconnected nodes: war; food; work, play, and travel; religions; and human and nonhuman interfaces. Through these five categories, Wai Chee Dimock and a team of emerging scholars reveal American literature to be a complex network, informed by crosscurrents both macro and micro, with local practices intensified by international concerns. Selections include poetry from Anne Bradstreet to Jorie Graham; the fiction of Herman Melville, Gertrude Stein, and William Faulkner; Benjamin Franklin's parables; Frederick Douglass's correspondence; Theodore Roosevelt's Rough Riders; Langston Hughes's journalism; and excerpts from The Autobiography of Malcom X as well as Octavia Butler's Dawn. Popular genres such as the crime novels of Raymond Chandler, the comics of Art Spiegelman, the science fiction of Philip K. Dick, and recipes from Alice B. Toklas are all featured. More recent authors include Junot Diaz, Leslie Marmon Silko, Jonathan Safran Foer, Edwidge Danticat, Gary Shteyngart, and Jhumpa Lahiri. These selections speak to readers at all levels and invite them to try out fresh groupings and remap American literature. A continually updated interactive component at www.amlitintheworld.yale.edu complements the anthology.
An inventive, exciting anthology of American literature that promises to make teaching and taking a survey course a global adventure! Collages of clustered texts around thematic nodes suggest creative juxtapositions certain to spark student interest. Familiar classics and less-known texts are well balanced, and the digital platform brings the American survey course into the twenty-first century of collaborations. Susan Stanford Friedman, author of Planetary Modernisms: Provocations on Modernity Across Time
This is a vital anthology, both in conception and execution. For students and faculty alike, it will create an unprecedented sense of the dynamic force fields of American literature. I'm especially impressed by the anthology's fluid movement across media platforms and geographical divides. Rob Nixon, Princeton University
With the inimitable vision we have come to expect from her, Dimock has assembled a nimble model for reading American literature beyond U.S. borders and traditional periodization, across both space and time. This vision of American literary history as an international, outward-facing, worldly tradition is timely and needed. Anna Brickhouse, University of Virginia
Introduction
I. War
Beginnings
Anne Bradstreet, "Semiramis"
Louise Glück, "Parable of the Hostages"
William Carlos Williams, "The Destruction of Tenochtitlan"
Elizabeth Bishop, "Brazil, January 1, 1502"
William Apess, "Eulogy on King Philip"
French Revolution, 1789–1799
Thomas Jefferson, Letter to General Lafayette, June 16, 1792
Haitian Revolution, 1791–1804
Thomas Jefferson, Letter to James Monroe, July 14, 1793
Victor Séjour, "The Mulatto"
Mexican War, 1846–1848
Henry David Thoreau, "Resistance to Civil Government"
Revolutionary Europe, 1848–1849
Margaret Fuller, Dispatch 29
Spanish-American War, 1898–1902
Stephen Crane, "Stephen Crane's Vivid Story of the Battle of San Juan"
Mark Twain, "Incident in the Philippines"
John Ashbery, "Memories of Imperialism"
World War I, 1914–1918
Edith Wharton, Fighting France
Rita Dove, "The Return of Lieutenant James Reese Europe"
Spanish Civil War, 1936–1939
Muriel Rukeyser, Mediterranean
Langston Hughes, "Harlem Swing and Spanish Shells"
Langston Hughes, "General Franco's Moors"
Philip Levine, "To P.L., 1916–1937"
World War II, 1939–1945
Gertrude Stein, Brewsie and Willie
T. S. Eliot, "Little Gidding," from Four Quartets
Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five
Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close
Art Spiegelman, Maus
Jorie Graham, "Soldatenfriedhof"
William Faulkner, "Two Soldiers"
Norman Mailer, The Naked and the Dead
John Hersey, Hiroshima
Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony
Chang-Rae Lee, A Gesture Life
Philip K. Dick, The Man in the High Castle
Korean War, 1950–1953
Thomas McGrath, "Ode for the American Dead in Asia"
Myung Mi Kim, "Under Flag"
Cuban Revolution, 1959
Jay Cantor, The Death of Che Guevara
Vietnam War, 1955–1975
Michael Herr, Dispatches
Yusef Komunyakaa, "Tu Do Street"
W. S. Merwin, "The Asians Dying"
Maxine Hong Kingston, China Men
Latin American State Violence, 1947–1991
Joan Didion, Salvador
Junot Díaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao
Middle Eastern Conflict, 1991–present
Philip Roth, Operation Shylock
Michael Chabon, The Yiddish Policemen's Union
Naomi Shihab Nye, "For Mohammed Zeid of Gaza, Age 15"
II. Food
Scarcity and Hunger
Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, La Relación
Mary Rowlandson, The Sovereignty and Goodness of God
Louise Erdrich, "Captivity"
Theodore Roosevelt, The Rough Riders
E. E. Cummings, The Enormous Room
Amy Tan, The Kitchen God's Wife
Ha Jin, War Trash
Sharon Olds, "The Food-Thief"
Ursula K. Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness
Procuring, Preparing, and Consuming
Herman Melville, "Stubb's Supper," from Moby-Dick
Jack London, "The Water Baby"
Upton Sinclair, The Jungle
Willa Cather, Death Comes for the Archbishop
Alice B. Toklas, The Alice B. Toklas Cookbook
Monique Truong, The Book of Salt
Natasha Trethewey, "Kitchen Maid with Supper at Emmaus, or The Mulata after the painting by Diego Velazquez, ca. 1619"
Oscar Hijuelos, Our House in the Last World
Cristina García, Dreaming in Cuban
Jamaica Kincaid, Annie John
Julia Alvarez, How the García Girls Lost Their Accents
Edwidge Danticat, Breath, Eyes, Memory
Jhumpa Lahiri, "When Mr. Pirzada Came to Dine"
Allen Ginsberg, "One Morning I Took a Walk in China"
Gerald Vizenor, Griever: An American Monkey King in China
Ruth Ozeki, My Year of Meats
Gary Shteyngart, Absurdistan
Brainy Fruit
Marianne Moore, "Nine Nectarines and Other Porcelain"
Gary Snyder, "Mu Chi's Persimmons"
Richard Blanco, "Mango No. 61"
III. Work, Play, Travel
Varieties of Fieldwork
Frederick Douglass, Letter to William Lloyd Garrison, March 27, 1846
Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Marble Faun
Henry James, The American
Richard Wright, Black Power
Norman Rush, Mating
Robert Hass, "Ezra Pound's Proposition"
Robert Pinsky, "The Banknote"
Karen Tei Yamashita, Through the Arc of the Rain Forest
Agha Shahid Ali, "In Search of Evanescence"
Rivalries and Partnerships
Herman Melville, "The Monkey Rope," from Moby-Dick
Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin
W. E. B. Du Bois, Dark Princess
John Steinbeck, East of Eden
Langston Hughes, "Something in Common"
James Baldwin, "Encounter on the Seine: Black Meets Brown"
Maya Angelou, All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes
Ishmael Reed, Flight to Canada
Audre Lorde, Zami: A New Spelling of My Name
Raymond Chandler, The Long Goodbye
Rolando Hinojosa, Partners in Crime
Sherman Alexie, "The Game Between the Jews and the Indians Is Tied Going Into the Bottom of the Ninth Inning"
Music-Making
Walt Whitman, "Proud Music of the Storm"
Claude McKay, Banjo
Amiri Baraka, Blues People
Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon
Robert Pinsky, "Ginza Samba"
IV. Religions
Faith Without Dogma
Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of Olaudah Equiano
George Washington, Letter to the Hebrew Congregation of Newport, August 21, 1790
Benjamin Franklin, "A Parable Against Persecution"
Thomas Paine, "Profession of Faith"
Ralph Waldo Emerson, "The Divinity School Address"
Herman Melville, "A Bosom Friend," from Moby-Dick
Emily Dickinson, "The Bible is an Antique Volume" and "Apparently with No Surprise"
Zitkala-Ša, "Why I Am a Pagan"
Vernacular Devotions
Zora Neale Hurston, Moses, Man of the Mountain
Gloria Anzaldúa, Borderlands/La Frontera
N. Scott Momaday, House Made of Dawn
Denise Levertov, "The Altars in the Street"
Gary Snyder, "Grace"
Jack Kerouac, The Dharma Bums
Joanne Kyger, "Here in Oaxaca It's the Night of the Radishes"
Many Islams
Washington Irving, "Legend of the Arabian Astrologer"
Paul Bowles, The Spider's House
Malcolm X, The Autobiography of Malcolm X
John Updike, Terrorist
Mohsin Hamid, The Reluctant Fundamentalist
The Grateful Dead, "Blues for Allah"
V. Human and Nonhuman Interfaces
Ants
Henry David Thoreau, Walden
Marianne Moore, "Critics and Connoisseurs"
Ezra Pound, Canto LXXX I
Robert Lowell, "Ants"
Toni Morrison, Tar Baby
Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible
Commodities and Markets
Elizabeth Alexander, "Amistad"
Herman Melville, "The Advocate," from Moby-Dick
Frank Norris, The Octopus
John Dos Passos, The Big Money
Dave Eggers and Valentino Achak Deng, What Is the What
Destructive Agents
Jack London, "The Scarlet Plague"
Saul Bellow, Henderson the Rain King
Robert Frost, "Fire and Ice"
Carl Sandburg, "Buttons"
Randall Jarrell, "The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner"
Adrienne Rich, "The School Among the Ruins"
Brian Turner, "Here, Bullet"
George Oppen, "The Crowded Countries of the Bomb"
Denise Levertov, "Dom Helder Camara at the Nuclear Test Site"
Nonhuman Intelligence
Isaac Asimov, I, Robot
Richard Powers, Galatea 2.2
William Gibson, Neuromancer
Ray Bradbury, The Martian Chronicles
Philip K. Dick, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
Octavia Butler, Dawn
Notes
Permissions
Index of Authors
General Index

About the Author

Wai Chee Dimock is William Lampson Professor of English and American Studies at Yale University. Her most recent books are Shades of the Planet: American Literature as World Literature (2007) and Through Other Continents: American Literature across Deep Time (2006). Editor of PMLA, and a film critic for the Los Angeles Review of Books, her essays have also appeared in Critical Inquiry, the Chronicle of Higher Education, the New York Times, and the New Yorker.

Jordan Brower is a graduate student at Yale University. Edgar Garcia is an assistant professor at the University of Chicago. Kyle Hutzler works for McKinsey & Company. Nicholas Rinehart is a graduate student at Harvard University.