Cinema in the Digital Age

Nicholas Rombes

Wallflower Press

Cinema in the Digital Age

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Pub Date: June 2009

ISBN: 9781905674855

224 Pages

Format: Paperback

List Price: $26.00£22.00

Pub Date: June 2009

ISBN: 9780231501484

224 Pages

Format: E-book

List Price: $20.99£18.00

Cinema in the Digital Age

Nicholas Rombes

Wallflower Press

Does the digital era spell the death of cinema as we know it? Or is it merely heralding its rebirth? Are we witnessing the emergence of something entirely new? Cinema in the Digital Age examines the fate of cinema in this new era, paying special attention to the technologies that are reshaping film and their cultural impact. Examining Festen (1998), The Blair Witch Project (1999), Timecode (2000), Russian Ark (2002), The Ring (2002), among others, this volume explores how these films are haunted by their analogue past and suggests that their signature element are their deliberate imperfections, whether those take the form of blurry or pixilated images, shakey camera work, or other elements reminding viewers of the human hand guiding the camera. Weaving together a rich variety of sources, Cinema in the Digital Age provides a deeply humanistic look at the meaning of cinematic images in the era of digital perfection.

Cinema in the Digital Age is mandatory reading for any media theorist.... [it] should remain on your desk between Barthes's Camera Lucida and Manovich's The Language of New Media.... Rombes pumps out an unabashed humanist manifesto, finding beauty in the dirt and noise that resist the cleanliness of digital culture.

Acknowledgements
Introduction
The Adorno Paradox
Against Method
Analogue/Digital Splice
Boredom and Analogue Nostalgia
The Digital Spectacular
Disposable Aesthetics
DV Humanism
Filmless Films
Frame Dragging
The Ideology of The Long Take
Image/Text
Incompleteness
Interfaces
iPod Experiment
Ironic Mode
Looking At Yourself Looking: Avatar As Spectator
Media As Its Own Theory
Mobile Viewing
Moving Space In The Frame, And A Note On Film Theory
Natural Time
Nonlinear
Pausing
Punk
Realism
Real Time
The Real You
Remainders
Sampling
Secondary Becomes Primary
Self-deconstructing Narratives
Shaky Camera
Shoot! [Si Gira]
Simultaneous Cinema
Small Screens
Target Video
Time, Memory
Time-Shifting
Tmesis: Skimming And Skipping
Undirected Films
Viewer Participation
Virtual Humanism: Part
Virtual Humanism: Part
Visible Language, Spring 1977
Filmography
Bibliography

About the Author

Nicholas Rombes is chair of the English Department at the University of Detroit Mercy. He is the author of The Ramones (2005) and editor of New Punk Cinema (2005), as well as a contributor of numerous articles on cinema and culture.