Food of Sinful Demons

Meat, Vegetarianism, and the Limits of Buddhism in Tibet

Geoffrey Barstow

Columbia University Press

Food of Sinful Demons

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Pub Date: October 2017

ISBN: 9780231179966

320 Pages

Format: Hardcover

List Price: $65.00£54.95

Pub Date: October 2017

ISBN: 9780231542302

320 Pages

Format: E-book

List Price: $64.99£54.95

Food of Sinful Demons

Meat, Vegetarianism, and the Limits of Buddhism in Tibet

Geoffrey Barstow

Columbia University Press

Tibetan Buddhism teaches compassion toward all beings, a category that explicitly includes animals. Slaughtering animals is morally problematic at best, and, at worst, completely incompatible with a religious lifestyle. Yet historically most Tibetans—both monastic and lay—have made meat a regular part of their diet. In this study of the place of vegetarianism within Tibetan religiosity, Geoffrey Barstow explores the tension between Buddhist ethics and Tibetan cultural norms to offer a novel perspective on the spiritual and social dimensions of meat eating.

Food of Sinful Demons shows the centrality of vegetarianism to the cultural history of Tibet through specific ways in which nonreligious norms and ideals shaped religious beliefs and practices. Barstow offers a detailed analysis of the debates over meat eating and vegetarianism from the first references to such a diet in the tenth century through the Chinese invasion in the 1950s. He discusses elements of Tibetan Buddhist thought—including monastic vows, the Buddhist call to compassion, and tantric antinomianism—that see meat eating as morally problematic. He then looks beyond religious attitudes to the cultural, economic, and environmental factors that opposed the Buddhist critique of meat, including Tibetan concepts of medicine and health, food scarcity, the display of wealth, and idealized male gender roles. Barstow argues that the issue of meat eating was influenced by a complex interplay of factors, with religious perspectives largely supporting vegetarianism while practical concerns and secular ideals pulled in the other direction. He concludes by addressing the surge in vegetarianism in contemporary Tibet in light of evolving notions of Tibetan identity and resistance against the central Chinese state. The first book to discuss this complex issue, Food of Sinful Demons is essential reading for scholars interested in Tibetan religion, history, and culture.
A creative and nuanced exploration of Tibetan religiosity that has heretofore remained largely in the dark. An important and exciting book. Andrew Quintman, Yale University
A very welcome and entirely novel work on the place of vegetarianism in Tibet, ​Food of Sinful Demons will make a solid scholarly contribution to religious studies, Buddhist studies and Tibetan studies. Covering a topic of broad interest in fields from religion to animal rights, it offers something new for specialists but is also accessible to undergraduates as well as educated Buddhists trying to understand the role of vegetarianism and meat-eating in Tibetan Buddhism.
Gray Tuttle, Leila Hadley Luce Associate Professor of Modern Tibetan Studies, Columbia University
In this first in-depth study of the history of vegetarianism in Tibet, Geoffrey Barstow clearly shows that vegetarianism has always existed in Tibetan culture and was essentially motivated by compassion for the animals. Food of Sinful Demons is a most welcome contribution to the important debate over the relationships between and among vegetarianism, health, and religion. Matthieu Ricard, author of A Plea for the Animals: The Moral, Philosophical and Evolutionary Imperative to Treat All Beings with Compassion

About the Author

Geoffrey Barstow is an assistant professor of religious studies at Oregon State University.