From Judgment to Passion

Devotion to Christ and the Virgin Mary, 800–1200

Rachel Fulton

Columbia University Press

From Judgment to Passion

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Pub Date: October 2005

ISBN: 9780231125512

752 Pages

Format: Paperback

List Price: $35.00£27.00

Pub Date: December 2002

ISBN: 9780231125505

752 Pages

Format: Hardcover

List Price: $105.00£81.00

Pub Date: December 2002

ISBN: 9780231500760

752 Pages

Format: E-book

List Price: $34.99£27.00

From Judgment to Passion

Devotion to Christ and the Virgin Mary, 800–1200

Rachel Fulton

Columbia University Press

Devotion to the crucified Christ is one of the most familiar, yet most disconcerting artifacts of medieval European civilization. How and why did the images of the dying God-man and his grieving mother achieve such prominence, inspiring unparalleled religious creativity as well such imitative extremes as celibacy and self-flagellation? To answer this question, Rachel Fulton ranges over developments in liturgical performance, private prayer, doctrine, and art. She considers the fear occasioned by the disappointed hopes of medieval Christians convinced that the apocalypse would come soon, the revulsion of medieval Jews at being baptized in the name of God born from a woman, the reform of the Church in light of a new European money economy, the eroticism of the Marian exegesis of the Song of Songs, and much more.
Devotion to the crucified Christ is one of the most familiar yet disconcerting artifacts of medieval European civilization. How and why did the images of the dying God-man and his grieving mother achieve such prominence, inspiring unparalleled religious creativity and emotional artistry even as they fostered such imitative extremes as celibacy, crusade, and self-flagellation?

Magisterial in style and comprehensive in scope, From Judgment to Passion is the first systematic attempt to explain the origins and initial development of European devotion to Christ in his suffering humanity and Mary in her compassionate grief. Rachel Fulton examines liturgical performance, doctrine, private prayer, scriptural exegesis, and art in order to illuminate and explain the powerful desire shared by medieval women and men to identify with the crucified Christ and his mother.

The book begins with the Carolingian campaign to convert the newly conquered pagan Saxons, in particular with the effort to explain for these new converts the mystery of the Eucharist, the miraculous presence of Christ's body at the Mass. Moving on to the early eleventh century, when Christ's failure to return on the millennium of his Passion (A.D. 1033) necessitated for believers a radical revision of Christian history, Fulton examines the novel liturgies and devotions that arose amid this apocalyptic disappointment. The book turns finally to the twelfth century when, in the wake of the capture of Jerusalem in the First Crusade, there occurred the full flowering of a new, more emotional sensibility of faith, epitomized by the eroticism of the Marian exegesis of the Song of Songs and by the artistic and architectural innovations we have come to think of as quintessentially high medieval.

In addition to its concern with explaining devotional change, From Judgment to Passion presses a second, crucial question: How is it possible for modern historians to understand not only the social and cultural functions but also the experience of faith—the impulsive engagement with the emotions, sometimes ineffable, of prayer and devotion? The answer, magnificently exemplified throughout this book's narrative, lies in imaginative empathy, the same incorporation of self into story that lay at the heart of the medieval effort to identify with Christ and Mary in their love and pain.
Fulton's sophisticated analysis of medieval prayer and liturgy reexamines the medieval conceptions of judgement, passion and salvation, and presents valuable new insights into the developements of the cult of the suffering Jesus and the compassionate Virgin Mary. This is truly an important book. Choice
This intellectual tour de force... paints in breathtaking strokes a gorgeous tapestry of the loyal devotion to the Man of Sorrows and the Mater Dolorosa. Publishers Weekly
The book offers remarkable depth as well as breadth in a most commendable manner. Library Journal
Fulton in this extraordinary book reconstructs the early history of devotion to the human and, ultimately, suffering Christ, from late antiquity through the age of Anselm of Canterbury, Peter Abaelard, Bernard of Clairvaux, and Peter Damian.... A work of extraordinary erudition, this book revolutionizes our knowledge of medieval spirituality. International Review of Biblical Studies
[Fulton's] magisterial book constitutes a distinguished contribution to the history of empathy. Karl F. Morrison, Journal of Religion
This is a courageous book. Fulton is party to no trend, faction, or fashion...I have not read a book in many years that taught me so much or moved me so deeply as this one. Thomas F. X. Noble, Theological Studies
Of interest to medievalists across the disciplines of history, art history, religious studies, and literature. Wanda Zemler-Cizewski, Marquette University, Speculum
Fulton displays an expert knowledge of a most impressive array of sources including theology, liturgy, hagiography, and religious art. Mary F. Thurlkill, Religious Studies Review
Fulton's clarity of thought and thoroughness of explication make her study as compelling as it is challenging. Marsha L. Dutton, Catholic Historical Review
One of the most subtle, moving, and important books in medieval religious history published over the last several decades. Kevin Madigan, History of Religions
A rich and stimulating study which stands in its own right and also offers potential avenues for future work. Sarah Hamilton, History: The Journal of the Historical Society
This is an important book that will continue to be read for very many years. Srah Jane Boss, American Historical Review
Part 1. "Christus Patiens"
1. History, Conversion, and the Saxon Christ
2. Apocalypse, Reform, and the Suffering Savior
3. Praying to the Crucified Christ
Part 2. "Maria Compatiens"
4. Praying to the Mother of the Crucified Judge
5. The Seal of the Mother Bride
6. The Voice of My Beloved, Knocking
7. Once Upon a Time...
8. "Commortua, Commoriens, Consepulta"

Winner, 2006 John Nicholas Brown Prize

Winner, 2003 Journal of the History of Ideas

Winner, 2017 Outstanding Academic Title of the Year

About the Author

Rachel Fulton is asssociate professor of history at the University of Chicago. She has held fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies and the Lilly Endowment, and she has been a Fellow at the National Humanities Center, where she began work on this book. Her current project is a study of the cognitive and ritual making of prayer in the monastic culture of the medieval West.