Immigration Policy in the Age of Punishment

Detention, Deportation, and Border Control

Edited by David C. Brotherton and Philip Kretsedemas

Columbia University Press

Immigration Policy in the Age of Punishment

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Pub Date: April 2018

ISBN: 9780231179379

344 Pages

Format: Paperback

List Price: $35.00£27.00

Pub Date: April 2018

ISBN: 9780231179362

344 Pages

Format: Hardcover

List Price: $105.00£81.00

Pub Date: April 2018

ISBN: 9780231545891

344 Pages

Format: E-book

List Price: $34.99£27.00

Immigration Policy in the Age of Punishment

Detention, Deportation, and Border Control

Edited by David C. Brotherton and Philip Kretsedemas

Columbia University Press

The events of 2016 catapulted immigration policy to the forefront of public debate, and Donald Trump’s administration has signaled a harsh turn in enforcement. Yet the deportation, detention, and border-control policies that North American and European countries have embraced are by no means new. In this book, sociologists David C. Brotherton and Philip Kretsedemas bring together an interdisciplinary group of contributors to reconsider the immigration policies of the Obama era and beyond in terms of a decades-long “age of punishment.”

Immigration Policy in the Age of Punishment takes a critical, interdisciplinary, and transnational look at current issues surrounding immigration in the U.S. and abroad. It examines key features of this age of punishment, connecting neoliberal governance, global labor markets, and the national obsession with securing borders to explain critical research and theory on immigration enforcement. Contributors document the continuities between presidential administrations and across countries from many perspectives, with chapters discussing Canada, Australia, France, the UK, the Dominican Republic, and Mexico in addition to the U.S. They offer macro-level analyses of deportations and border enforcement, analyses of national policy and jurisprudence, and ethnographic accounts of the daily life experience of the prison-to-deportation pipeline, the making of deportability, and post-deportation transitions for noncitizens. This book highlights new directions in critical immigration policy and enforcement and deportation studies with the aim of problematizing the age of punishment that currently reigns over borders and those who seek to cross them.
This timely volume takes sharp aim at institutions that continue to marginalize the vulnerable, and, in doing so, it makes important advances for Studies in Transgression. Toward that end, an impressive roster of international contributors demonstrates the global implications of border—and social—control. Michael Welch, Rutgers University and University of Buenos Aires
Immigration Policy in the Age of Punishment identifies the sharp edges of Western efforts to make life difficult for migrants. Importantly, it does so in part by doing what many books fail to do: expanding its gaze away from a narrow concern about the boundaries of nation-states. Reaching into fields as disparate as geography and sociology, these essays will begin to define the field of critical immigration enforcement studies. César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández, Sturm College of Law, University of Denver
This innovative book captures the changing nature of global migration and immigration policies, critiquing and contextualizing them for readers. Theoretically rich, Immigration Policy in the Age of Punishment is one of the more thorough efforts to draw important connections between mainstream aspects of U.S. criminal justice—such as hyper-incarceration and the self-reinforcing, self-fulfilling “tough on crime” approaches—and the criminalization of immigration. David Androff, Arizona State University
1. Introduction: Immigration Policy in an Age of Punishment, by Philip Kretsedemas and David Brotherton
I. Controlling Borders and Migrant Populations
2. Obama's Legacy as "Deporter in Chief,” by Tanya Bolash-Goza
3. Immigration Policy and Migrant Support Organizations in an Era of Austerity and Hope, by Deirdre Conlon
4. Ordinary Injustices: Persecution, Punishment, and the Criminalization of Asylum in Canada, by Graham Hudson
5. Seeking Asylum in Australia: The Role of Emotion and Narrative in State and Civil Society Responses, by Greg Martin and Claudia Tazreiter
6. Critiquing Zones of Exception: Actor-Oriented Approaches Explaining the Rise of Immigration Detention, by Matthew B. Flynn and Michael Flynn
7. The Controlled Expansion of Local Immigration Laws: An analysis of US Supreme Court Jurisprudence, by Philip Kretsedemas
II. Producing Deportable Subjects
8. The Sociology of Vindictiveness and the Deportable Alien, by David C. Brotherton and Sarah Tosh
9. Banished Yet Un-Deported: The Constitution of a ‘Floating Population’ of Deportees Within France, by Carolina Boe
10. Fear of Deportation as a Barrier to Immigrant Integration, by Shirley Leyro
11. Deported to Tijuana: Social Networks and Religious Communities, by María Dolores París and Gabriel Pérez Duperou
12. Medical Deportations: Blurring the Line between Health Care and Immigration Enforcement,, by Lisa Sun-Hee Park
13. Citizenship in the Green Card Army, by Sofya Aptekar
14. The Production of Immigration Exclusions under H-1B and L-1 Visas, by Payal Banerjee
15. The Precarious Deportee and Human Rights in the Dominican Republic, by Yolanda Martin
Contributors
Index

About the Author

David C. Brotherton is professor of sociology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Graduate Center, City University of New York. His Columbia University Press books include Gangs and Society: Alternative Perspectives (2003); The Almighty Latin King and Queen Nation: Street Politics and the Transformation of a New York Gang (2004); Keeping Out the Other: A Critical Introduction to Immigration Enforcement Today (2008); and Banished to the Homeland: Dominican Deportees and Their Stories of Exile (2011).


Philip Kretsedemas is associate professor of sociology at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. He is the author of The Immigration Crucible (2012, Columbia University Press) and Migrants and Race in the US (2013).