International Law and the Post-Soviet Space II

Essays on Ukraine, Intervention, and Non-Proliferation

Thomas D. Grant. Foreword by Stephen M. Schwebel.

ibidem Press

International Law and the Post-Soviet Space II

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Pub Date: April 2019

ISBN: 9783838212807

440 Pages

Format: Paperback

List Price: $50.00

Pub Date: April 2019

ISBN: 9783838272801

440 Pages

Format: E-book

List Price: $30.99

International Law and the Post-Soviet Space II

Essays on Ukraine, Intervention, and Non-Proliferation

Thomas D. Grant. Foreword by Stephen M. Schwebel.

ibidem Press

This volume deals with legal issues concerning Russia’s annexation of Crimea and intervention in the Donbas, so-called ‘frozen conflicts’ and ‘hybrid warfare,’ the use of courts and tribunals to address armed aggression, and the implications of recent events for the security guarantees connected to nuclear nonproliferation. Continuing from the first volume, which contains Parts One and Two on Chechnya and the Baltic States, this book is comprised of Part Three—Ukraine and other Successor States: Territorial Integrity and its Challengers in the Post-Soviet Space; Part Four—Intervention and International Law; Part Five—Legal Proceedings and Unlawful Claims; and Part Six—Non-Proliferation after Budapest.
Tom Grant takes a generalist international lawyer's perspective to what he calls the post-Soviet space. The stellar quality of his argument will make this collection of considerable interest to generalists and indispensable to those academics and practitioners that engage with international legal issues in relation to the region. Martins Paparinskis, Reader in Public International Law, University College London
The expertise of Tom Grant regarding international law and the post-Soviet space is perfectly reflected in the present book collecting his main writings on the most topical and contemporary issues of that region. This is a definite must-read for anyone interested in grasping the intricacies of how international law is attempting to play its role in this particular region. Julien Fouret, international dispute resolution specialist, BETTO SERAGLINI (Paris)
Tom Grant's thoughtful writings address head-on one of the most intractable questions posed by international law: How to apply the standards governing the behavior of states to a state that refuses to adjust its behavior to those standards. In a fascinating series of studies of the legal issues presented by the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Grant ably traces the behavior of the Russian Federation as it seeks to reestablish the domination of adjacent territory achieved by the Soviet Union and the Russian Empire before it, and demonstrates chillingly how the Russian Federation has managed to skirt or to defy the norms of international law in each instance. John M. Townsend, Partner and Co-chair, Arbitration Practice Group, Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP

About the Author

Thomas D. Grant studied history and law at Harvard, Yale, and Cambridge. He has been an academic visitor at Heidelberg and Stanford and was a junior research fellow at Oxford. Since 2002, Grant has been a fellow of the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law and Wolfson College, University of Cambridge. He is the author of, among other books, Aggression against Ukraine (2015). Grant has published in a range of academic journals, including the American Journal of International Law, German Yearbook of International Law, and Polish Yearbook of International Law; is a contributing author of the Max-Planck Encyclopedia of Public International Law, and a founding editor of the Journal of International Dispute Settlement. He is the editor for recognition of states and state succession, among other topics, in the forthcoming tenth edition of Oppenheim’s International Law. He acts as counsel, expert, and advisor before the International Court of Justice, investment tribunals, and national courts.

Stephen M. Schwebel was, from 1997 to 2000, the president of the International Court of Justice at The Hague.