Kinship with Monkeys

The Guajá Foragers of Eastern Amazonia

Loretta A. Cormier

Columbia University Press

Kinship with Monkeys

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Pub Date: October 2003

ISBN: 9780231125253

288 Pages

Format: Paperback

List Price: $42.00£35.00

Pub Date: October 2003

ISBN: 9780231516327

288 Pages

Format: E-book

List Price: $41.99£35.00

Kinship with Monkeys

The Guajá Foragers of Eastern Amazonia

Loretta A. Cormier

Columbia University Press

Intrigued by a slide showing a woman breast-feeding a monkey, anthropologist Loretta A. Cormier spent fifteen months living among the Guajá, a foraging people in a remote area of Brazil. The result is this ethnographic study of the extraordinary relationship between the Guajá Indians and monkeys. While monkeys are a key food source for the Guajá, certain pet monkeys have a quasi-human status. Some infant monkeys are adopted and nurtured as human children while others are consumed in accordance with the "symbolic cannibalism" of their belief system.

The apparent contradiction of this predator/protector relationship became the central theme of Cormier's research: How can monkeys be both eaten as food and nurtured as children? Her research reveals that monkeys play a vital role in Guajá society, ecology, economy, and religion. In Guajá animistic beliefs, all forms of plant and animal life—especially monkeys—have souls and are woven into a comprehensive kinship system. Therefore, all consumption can be considered a form of cannibalism.

Cormier sets the stage for this enlightening study by examining the history of the Guajá and the ecological relationships between human and nonhuman primates in Amazonia. She also addresses the importance of monkeys in Guajá ecological adaptation as well as their role in the Guajá kinship system. Cormier then looks at animism and life classification among the Guajá and the role of pets, which provide a context for understanding "symbolic cannibalism" and how the Guajá relate to various forms of life in their natural and supernatural world. The book concludes with a discussion of the implications of ethnoprimatology beyond Amazonia, including Western perceptions of primates.

This book is an enchanting introduction to the world of anthropology for students and enthusiasts alike.

Carlotta Maggio & Elisabetta Visalberghi, American Journal of Primatology

very interesting reading...the principal beneficiaries of this book will be social and cultural anthropologists and ethnologists

Eckhard W. Heymann, Current Anthropology

Cormier presents a readable and enjoyable account of the Guajá and how their lives are intertwined with the lives of various primate species.

Journal of Anthropological Research

The best example yet of an emerging field called ethnoprimatology... Cormier deserves high praise.

W.C. McGrew, Human Ecology
Introduction
1. A Brief History of the Guajá
2. A Brief History of New World Monkeys
3. Monkey Hunting
4. Guajá Kinship
5. Animism and the Forest Siblings
6. Pet Monkeys
7. Cosmology and Symbolic Cannibalism
Conclusion. Ethnoprimatology in Amazonia and Beyond
Appendix. Monkeys in the Guajá Habitat

About the Author

Loretta A. Cormier is an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Alabama in Birmingham.