The Mingjia and Related Texts

Essentials in the Understanding of the Development of Pre-Qin Philosophy

Translated by Ian Johnston and Wang Ping

The Chinese University of Hong Kong Press

The Mingjia and Related Texts

Pub Date: January 2020

ISBN: 9789629967772

1184 Pages

Format: Hardcover

List Price: $80.00

The Mingjia and Related Texts

Essentials in the Understanding of the Development of Pre-Qin Philosophy

Translated by Ian Johnston and Wang Ping

The Chinese University of Hong Kong Press

ESSENTIALS IN THE UNDERSTANDING OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF PRE-QIN PHILOSOPHY

The Mingjia (School of Names) is a notional grouping of philosophers first recorded as such in the Shiji. Their identifying feature was a concern with linguistic issues particularly involving the correct use of names. The origin of this concern is taken to be Lunyu XIII.3. The group, as listed in the Han Shu, comprised seven men living between the sixth and third centuries BC. Only four of these men have extant writings attributed to them (Deng Xi, Yin Wen, Hui Shi and Gongsun Long) and in three of these there are issues of authenticity. Nevertheless, it is an important group for an understanding of the development of pre-Qin philosophy as the men themselves and the concepts they explored feature prominently in the writings of the other schools.

The present work contains four sections: (i) the extant writings of the four men; (ii) all significant references to them in other works up to the fourth century AD; (iii) other significant writing on the topics up to that time; and (iv) four appendices on specific issues concerning the school.
Table of Contents

Introduction

I. Texts and Translations


1. Deng Xizi

2. Yin Wenzi

3. Hui Shi’s Conversations with Zhuang Zhou (Zhuangzi)

4. Paradoxes (Theses) of Hui Shi & Others

5. Gongsun Longzi (Traditional Version)

6. Gongsun Longzi (A Modern Version)



II. Testimonia et Fragmenta

1. Dynastic Histories

2. Zuo Zhuan

3. Zhuangzi

4. Xunzi

5. Han Feizi

6. Liezi

7. Lü Shi Chunqiu

8. Huainanzi

9. Zhanguoce

10. Yantie Lun

11. Shuo Yuan

12. Liu Xiang and Liu Xin

13. Fa Yan (Yang Xiong)

14. Xin Lun (Huan Tan)

15. Feng Yan

16. Lun Heng (Wang Chong)

17. Gao You (Commentaries)

18. Zhong Lun (Xu Gan)

19. Yin Wenzi Xu (Zhongchang Tong)

20. Kongcongzi (Wang Su)

21. Lu Sheng (Jin Shu)

22. Baopuzi (Ge Hong)

23. Shishuo Xinyu (Liu Yiqing)



III. Related Texts

1. Lunyu IV.5, VIII.19, IX.2, XIII.3

2. Daodejing 1 & 2

3. Guanzi 36, 37, 38 – Xinshu Shang, Xinshu Xia, Bai Xin

4. Mozi 40-45 – Dialectical Chapters of the Later Mohists

5. Zhuangzi 2 – “Qiwu Lun”

6. Xunzi 22 – “Zheng Ming”

7. Hanfeizi 8 & 41 – “Yang Que” & “Wen Bian”

8. Shiji 47 – “Kongzi Shijia”

9. Zhonglun (Xu Gan) 8 & 11 – “He Bian” & “Kao Wei”

10. Yanjin Yilun (Ouyang Jian)

11. Zhaolun (Sengzhao) – “Buzhenkong Lun”, “Banruo Wuzhi Lun” & “Niepan Wuming”



IV. Appendices

1. Additional Comments on the Paradoxes

2. Authenticity and Other Issues regarding the Gongsun Longzi

3. Additional Commentary on the Mozi, Dialectical Chapters

4. Notes on the Relationship between the Gongsun Longzi and the Later Mohists



V. Bibliography

About the Author

IAN JOHNSTON is an independent scholar pursuing a lifelong interest in ancient languages, including translations of Chinese classics such as the Mozi and the Daxue and Zhongyong.

WANG PING is a senior lecturer in the School of Languages and Linguistics, University of New South Wales.