Toward a US-Indonesia Free Trade Agreement

Gary Clyde Hufbauer and Sjamsu Rahardja

Peterson Institute for International Economics

Toward a US-Indonesia Free Trade Agreement

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Pub Date: July 2007

ISBN: 9780881324020

214 Pages

Format: Paperback

List Price: $20.95£16.95

Toward a US-Indonesia Free Trade Agreement

Gary Clyde Hufbauer and Sjamsu Rahardja

Peterson Institute for International Economics

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Indonesia is the largest Muslim country in the world. Would a free trade agreement (FTA) with the country be beneficial both economically and politically to the United States? What kind of benefit could Indonesia expect? This book presents a case for improved trade relations between Indonesia and the United States and recommends advancing exploratory talks toward a US-Indonesia FTA. The authors present a detailed study of the stakes involved in the various areas of the proposed negotiation and estimate the FTA's potential for trade creation, trade diversion, and welfare under different scenarios.

About the Author

Gary Clyde Hufbauer, Reginald Jones Senior Fellow since 1992, was formerly the Maurice Greenberg Chair and Director of Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations (1996–98), the Marcus Wallenberg Professor of International Finance Diplomacy at Georgetown University (1985–92), senior fellow at the Institute (1981–85), deputy director of the International Law Institute at Georgetown University (1979–81); deputy assistant secretary for international trade and investment policy of the US Treasury (1977–79); and director of the international tax staff at the Treasury (1974–76).

Sjamsu Rahardja, visiting fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, is an economist for the East Asia and Pacific Region at the World Bank. He joined the Bank as a consultant for projects analyzing the investment climate in Indonesia and the Philippines. His research areas include integration in equity markets in East Asia, corporate regulation and financing constraints in Indonesia, effect of trade on firm's productivity in Indonesia, and effect of tax deduction on health insurance offerings in US firms.