Videophilosophy

The Perception of Time in Post-Fordism

Maurizio Lazzarato. Edited and translated by Jay Hetrick.

Columbia University Press

Videophilosophy

Google Preview

Pub Date: February 2019

ISBN: 9780231175395

304 Pages

Format: Paperback

List Price: $30.00£24.00

Pub Date: February 2019

ISBN: 9780231175388

304 Pages

Format: Hardcover

List Price: $90.00£70.00

Pub Date: February 2019

ISBN: 9780231540162

304 Pages

Format: E-book

List Price: $29.99£24.00

Videophilosophy

The Perception of Time in Post-Fordism

Maurizio Lazzarato. Edited and translated by Jay Hetrick.

Columbia University Press

The Italian philosopher Maurizio Lazzarato has earned international acclaim for his analysis of contemporary capitalism, in particular his influential concept of immaterial labor and his perceptive writings on debt. In Videophilosophy, he reveals the underpinnings of contemporary subjectivity in the aesthetics and politics of mass media. First written in French and published in Italian and later revised but never published in full, this book discloses the conceptual groundwork of Lazzarato’s thought as a whole for a time when his writings have become increasingly influential.

Drawing on Bergson, Nietzsche, Benjamin, Deleuze and Guattari, and the film theory and practice of Dziga Vertov, Lazzarato constructs a new philosophy of media that ties political economy to the politics of aesthetics. Through his concept of “machines that crystallize time,” he argues that the proliferation of digital technologies over the past half-century marks the transition to a new mode of capitalist production characterized by unprecedented forms of subjection. This new era of the commodification of the self, Lazzarato declares, demands novel types of political action that challenge the commercialization and exploitation of time. This crucial text by an essential contemporary thinker offers vital new perspectives on aesthetics, politics, and media and critical theory.
Like his comrade Antonio Negri, Maurizio Lazzarato has dedicated himself to exploring the less-traveled paths of modern thought in search of alternatives to capitalist modernity. In Videophilosophy, that exploration produces stunning results. Drawing on Bergson, Nietzsche, Vertov, Nam June Paik, and Bill Viola, Lazzarato constructs an innovative and compelling sequel to two of the most revolutionary texts in media studies: Gilles Deleuze's Cinema books and Walter Benjamin's 'The Work of Art in the Age of Its Technological Reproducibility.' Timothy Murphy, author of Antonio Negri: Modernity and the Multitude
This elegant translation makes available to Maurizio Lazzarato's growing English readership the theoretical cornerstone of his intellectual project, and puts into context his collaborative practice in video art. Videophilosophy makes an indispensable contribution to the philosophy of time and technology amidst and against the proliferation of contemporary capitalist subjectivities. Gary Genosko, author of When Technocultures Collide: Innovation from Below and the Struggle for Autonomy
How can time become crystallized in machines? From the cinematic image to the computational image of digital technologies, the artificial dilatation and construction of time has become equivalent to processes of thought. Videophilosophy takes you on a journey across these machinic syntheses of time, inaugurating a much-awaited media theory binding together materiality and technology in an unprecedented fashion. Luciana Parisi, author of Contagious Architecture. Computation, Aesthetics, and Space
Lazzarato’s Political Onto- aesthetics, by Jay Hetrick
Introduction
1. The War Machine of the Kino-Eye and the Kinoki Against the Spectacle
2. Bergson and Machines That Crystallize Time
3. Video, Flows, and Real Time
4. Bergson and Synthetic Images
5. Nietzsche and Technologies of Simulation
6. The Economy of Affective Forces
7. The Concept of Collective Perception
Afterword: Videophilosophy Now—an Interview with Maurizio Lazzarato
Notes
Index

About the Author

Maurizio Lazzarato is a philosopher and sociologist. In the 1970s, he was involved with the Autonomia Operaia movement in Italy and was a founding member of the French journal Multitudes. His books in English include Signs and Machines: Capitalism and the Production of Subjectivity (2014) and Governing by Debt (2015).

Jay Hetrick is assistant professor of art history and theory at the College of Fine Arts and Design, University of Sharjah.